German Continuous Nuclear Fusion Reactor Milestone

I’ll put my money on this being sustainable before wind.

Watts Up With That?

"W7X-Spulen Plasma blau gelb" by Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik - Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:W7X-Spulen_Plasma_blau_gelb.jpg#/media/File:W7X-Spulen_Plasma_blau_gelb.jpg “W7X-Spulen Plasma blau gelb” by Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik – Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:W7X-Spulen_Plasma_blau_gelb.jpg#/media/File:W7X-Spulen_Plasma_blau_gelb.jpg

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

Germany has activated its new Wendelstein 7-X Stellarator reactor for the first time, briefly testing its ability to heat and contain a Helium plasma. The German Stellarator is the first nuclear fusion reactor ever built which has a chance of hitting break even – or at the very least, of maintaining a sustained nuclear fusion reaction for up to half an hour at a time.

According to World Nuclear News;

After more than a year of technical preparations and tests, the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator has produced its first helium plasma.

On 10 December, the operating team in the control room started up the magnetic field and initiated the computer-operated experiment control system. It fed around one milligram of helium gas into…

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